Meanjin Vol. 71, No. 1

Sally Heath (editor)
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Meanjin Vol. 71, No. 1
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Meanjin Vol. 71, No. 1

Published

1 March 2012

ISBN

9780522861655

Weight

418g

Size

241mm x 172mm

Imprint

Meanjin

Meanjin Vol. 71, No. 1

Sally Heath (editor)
The March edition of Meanjin features Raimond Gaita, Melanie Joosten, Tom Cho and many more.
In the March issue of Meanjin two very different writers offer new insights into events that transfixed the nation.

John Bryson returned to Uluru last year for the first time since writing Evil Angels. He reflects on the travesty of justice that was systematically, and very publicly, inflicted on a grieving mother. Shari Kocher chooses poetry to explore the emotions and mind of Arthur Freeman when on the morning of 29 January 2009 he stopped his car in the emergency lane of the landmark bridge, reached over his son, unstrapped his daughter and threw her into the water 80 metres below.

In a long-form essay Raimond Gaita argues for the very considerable benefits (to society and the individual) of a generalist education; Tom Cho's short story of some 8000 words is both unsettling and funny, and marks the beginning of Meanjin Papers, a new project highlighting one exceptional longer work each edition.
In the March issue of Meanjin two very different writers offer new insights into events that transfixed the nation.

John Bryson returned to Uluru last year for the first time since writing Evil Angels. He reflects on the travesty of justice that was systematically, and very publicly, inflicted on a grieving mother. Shari Kocher chooses poetry to explore the emotions and mind of Arthur Freeman when on the morning of 29 January 2009 he stopped his car in the emergency lane of the landmark bridge, reached over his son, unstrapped his daughter and threw her into the water 80 metres below.

In a long-form essay Raimond Gaita argues for the very considerable benefits (to society and the individual) of a generalist education; Tom Cho's short story of some 8000 words is both unsettling and funny, and marks the beginning of Meanjin Papers, a new project highlighting one exceptional longer work each edition.
Paperback
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Ships in 1–3 days
Other formats available