• ISBN: (Paperback)9780522856279
  • PUBLISHED:01/Sep/2009
  • IMPRINT:Meanjin
  • SUBJECT:Literary reference works

Meanjin Vol. 68, No.3

Sophie Cunningham

  • Paperback $24.99

Includes new writing by Sian Prior, Mark Mordue, Carolyn Fraser, Ben Eltham, Georgia Blain, and more.

In the September edition of Meanjin Mike Pottenger asks whether Robin Hood was a medieval hero or Mafiosi, Carolyn Fraser writes on letterpresses and the secret life of objects, Jim Guida describes the art in skateboarding and Justin Clemens surveys the contemporary Australian Art scene. Book designer, Mary Callaghan gives us an insight into laying out a page of Nick Cave's sacred objects while Mark Mordue provides a riveting and poetic overview of Cave's life and work. Matthew Klugman writes on the tragedy of being a footy fan at final time, Ben Eltham considers JJJ's hold over the Australian music scene, Sian Prior writes about the Balibo Five and East Timor and Sophie Cunningham interviews filmmaker Robert Connolly on writing the screenplay for his film on the same subject: Balibo. In more personal essays Elly Valenti explores the concept of turning back and Elmo Keep meditates on being inscribed with a tattoo. There's an outstanding range of fiction by Pierz Newton-John, Georgia Blain, Nadia Wheatley, Tim Richards, Caroline Lee and newcomer Ruby Murray.

About the author

Sophie Cunningham is the author of two novels, Geography and Bird, and the non-fiction books, Melbourne and more recently Warning: The Story of Cyclone Tracy. She was also the editor of Meanjin and was, until recently, the chair of the Australian Council's literature board.

Other Publications by Sophie Cunningham

    • Meanjin Vol. 70, No. 1
    • Sophie Cunningham
    • Paperback $24.99
    • In the March edition of Meanjin, Lorin Clarke investigates whether the Melbourne International Comedy Festival is as funny as it could be, Kate Holden considers the relationship between sex work and feminism, Laurie Steed tells us why YouTube is no longer the bad arse of the digital world and Ben O'Mara hangs out with Billie-Anne Baird, one of the f... Read more...

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    • Meanjin Vol. 69, No. 4
    • Sophie Cunningham
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    • This December, Meanjin turns seventy. As Australia's second oldest literary journal, it has helped our nation develop a cultural identity, critiqued that identity and, more recently, saw globalisation threaten Australia's newfound sense of self. A list of the contributors over the years is like a roll call of Australian literature and, to celebrate,... Read more...

    • Paperback $24.99
    • Meanjin Vol 69, No. 3
    • Sophie Cunningham
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    • In our penultimate 70th birthday edition, Meanjin wonders what it takes to make a city: Diana Wells visits Melbourne's ever-shifting outer edge and David Nichols takes a walk through the early housing commission suburb of Doveton. Elizabeth Glickfeld considers Melbourne's latest logo and corporate culture; Rachel Weaver reminds us that, not so long ... Read more...

    • Paperback $24.99
    • Meanjin Vol. 69, No. 2
    • Sophie Cunningham
    • Paperback $24.99
    • In the winter edition of Meanjin, Katherine Wilson opens the velvet curtains onto the world of steampunk, Guy Rundle considers the state's relationship to culture and the implication of that for artists, Kate Crawford retracts from the overwhelming hum of the digital age and Michael Green brings to life the painful but constructive dialogue that is ... Read more...

    • Paperback $24.99
    • Meanjin Vol. 69, No. 1
    • Sophie Cunningham
    • Paperback $24.99
    • The March edition of Meanjin looks at charisma: of religion, of science, of teachers. Paul Mitchell surveys religion in Australian literature, Helen Barnes-Bulley asks if atheists can enjoy religious art, Jeff Sparrow writes on New Atheism and John Potts looks at the religious impulse in a secular world. Terin Miller describes meeting the Dalai Lama... Read more...

    • Paperback $24.99
    • Meanjin Vol. 68, No. 4
    • Sophie Cunningham
    • Paperback $24.99
    • In the December edition of Meanjin, Jane Gleeson-White considers the power of storytelling traditions, Helen Barnes-Bulley takes a look at the symbolism behind fashion and costume in film and literature and Ben Eltham puts himself in the thick of the Australian arts festival scene. In a special ten-thousand word essay, novelist Charlotte Wood consid... Read more...

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    • Meanjin Vol. 68, No.2
    • Sophie Cunningham
    • Paperback $24.99
    • The June edition of Meanjin includes Sian Prior on shyness, Rachel Buchanan on the impact of seeing the work of artist, Len Lye, when she was still a child and Marcus Westbury on the ways in which funding bodies shape our cultural lives. Mark Dapin, still in recovery from interviewing Gordon Ramsay a year ago, writes on the perils of the celebrity f... Read more...

    • Paperback $24.99
    • Meanjin Vol. 68, No.1
    • Sophie Cunningham
    • Paperback $24.99
    • In the March edition of Meanjin, Declan Kelly gives us the low-down on Melbourne's music scene, Nam Le tells us why he likes to take readers to the edge-then leave them there, Humphrey McQueen looks at what's happening to the Australian Public Library system, Beth Driscoll considers the new literary prizes on the block, George Dunford takes us insid... Read more...

    • Paperback $24.99
    • Meanjin Vol.67 No.3
    • Sophie Cunningham
    • Paperback $24.99
    • Sophie Cunningham is Meanjin's new (and eighth) editor but the footsteps that will take Meanjin forward are those laid down by Clem Christesen, the journal's founding editor, in 1940. Christesen once said he wanted Meanjin to 'make clear the connection between literature and politics'. So does Cunningham: 'Let's see where those footsteps take us ne... Read more...

    • Paperback $24.99
    • Meanjin Vol. 67, No 2
    • Sophie Cunningham
    • Paperback $24.99
    • The June edition will include the first of what will be regular author interviews, the first with author and poet Luke Davies.As well, writer and performance artist Fiona McGregor, inspired by a recent trip to Poland, examines the concept of decadence; Paul Mitchell considers violence between brothers; designer and typesetter Ampersand Duck tells us... Read more...

    • Paperback $24.99

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    • Meanjin Vol. 71, No. 1
    • Sally Heath
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    • In the March issue of Meanjin two very different writers offer new insights into events that transfixed the nation. John Bryson returned to Uluru last year for the first time since writing Evil Angels. He reflects on the travesty of justice that was systematically, and very publicly, inflicted on a grieving mother. Shari Kocher chooses poetry to exp... Read more...

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    • Meanjin Vol. 70, No. 3
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    • Tom Keneally argues that the garden of our national identity is a capacious and adaptable one that has always been enriched by greater diversity. Maria Tumarkin ponders the conflict between professional integrity and personal disgrace.Guy Rundle asks where pornography sits in the spectrum of human sexuality, Lorelei Vashti revisits Istanbul and hers... Read more...

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    • Meanjin Vol. 70, No. 2
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    • In the June edition of Meanjin, the irrepressible Ben Pobjie takes on the topic of controversial comedy, and explains why he doesn't particularly care if you're offended. Maria Tumarkin makes a potent argument for the role of storytelling in expanding our 'moral imagination' toward asylum seekers in Australia. Way down south, Peter Timms visits Tasm... Read more...

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    • Meanjin Vol. 70, No. 1
    • Sophie Cunningham
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    • In the March edition of Meanjin, Lorin Clarke investigates whether the Melbourne International Comedy Festival is as funny as it could be, Kate Holden considers the relationship between sex work and feminism, Laurie Steed tells us why YouTube is no longer the bad arse of the digital world and Ben O'Mara hangs out with Billie-Anne Baird, one of the f... Read more...

    • Paperback $24.99